I’m Hopping!

Okay, let me clarify. I’m BLOG hopping. The only time you’ll find me PHYSICALLY hopping is if there’s a spider within touching distance.

hop badge 2013Today I am supremely honored to be a participant in the Hop Against Homophobia… And Transphobia.  I’m in excellent company – almost 200 of us are joining the party this year. I hope you’ll check out their blog posts.

A year ago I posted on this very topic. HERE’s the link. In last year’s post, I talked about my experience in public education – how I’ve seen attitudes slooooowly shift. I also talked about how freaking PROUD I was of my amazing student who used the day as a vehicle to educate her peers. I’m even prouder of this young woman today, as she begins her grown-up life as an out and proud lesbian in the US Army. I’m also terrified for her, because I know the out and proud part is going to make her life more difficult – painfully more difficult – on many levels. But I know, deep in my gut know, that hiding it – or even just not being open about it – would be even more painful for her.

My baby, my beautiful, brave baby, has an irresistible need to celebrate all the wonder and joy in her life. She inspires me.

So, today I’m celebrating her, and all the students who came into my classroom out and proud. The kids who faced their peers with grace and courage. The kids who stood up to the bullies, who took it and used it and didn’t let the fear and ignorance they faced make them bitter and filled with hate. Those kids? Deserve more than a day or a week every year. Those kids deserve to be celebrated every minute of every day. They are heroes.

Today I’m also mourning for those kids who came into my classroom afraid. Those kids – the ones who were out, but beaten down (sometimes literally) by the hate and intolerance surrounding them – they broke my heart then, and they break my heart now. Those kids are living, breathing evidence that we’ve got a long way to go. The only way to make things better for these kids is to shine a bright light on the ignorance and fear (because doesn’t all hate stem from ignorance and fear?) so the world can see how foolish it is – can see how beautiful our children are and can learn to celebrate the wonder and joy that they are.

I hope you’ll join me, and millions of others HERE, at the webpage for the Day Against Homophobia. You’ll learn a lot – including how you can make a difference in our society at large, and in the lives of individual people.

And now, the gift!

duct tape rose penAs part of the Hop, each and every one of the 180 or so blogs participating are offering a prize. Mine is a care package – sort of like one I’d send to my baby in the army. (I didn’t forget, sweetie. I *do* have stuff to send you!) It includes yummy treats, fabulous reading material, and some really cool swag – like this pen, which is hand made by moi.

All you have to do to enter is leave a comment on this blog with your email included. You don’t have to leave more than your email, but I’d love to hear what you have to say about your experiences with PRIDE and with the Day Against Homophobia!

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25 Comments

  1. Thank you for taking part in the hop! A great post indeed.

    kimberlyFDR@yahoo.com

  2. That’s a pen! It looks great. I’m not crafty enough to even being to imagine how you made that. (And I’m so with you on the spider front).

    It’s so nice to hear about your student. She sounds like one heck of a woman. I hope she does well in the army ^.^

    • Isn’t it the coolest pen ever? 😀 And it’s actually pretty easy to make – just time consuming. I’ve got other goodies, too. Chocolate, even!

  3. Thank you for taking part in the hop! A great post indeed.

    parisfan_ca@yahoo.com

    • 🙂
      I’m really excited to participate! I saw so much angst while teaching – and so many brave kids. I’d love to just post about every one of them!

  4. That was a wonderful post. I think that there are some wonderful stories out there and it was nice to hear one of such bravery. Thanks for participating in the hop!

    Beth
    JPadawan11@gmail.com

    • Thanks, Beth. I’m trying to get my girl to share some of her story first hand, but the Army, ya know. Keeps a newbie busy!

  5. Thank you for your great post. Thanks for participating in the blog hop!

  6. uhh school … other students … hmmm no I really didn’t like either also can’t say I cared for much of the teachers. I don’t think I ever had a good bye that I was more happy about.

    So I guess thank you for taking care of your students!

    leo.v.s at aol dot com

    • Yeah, high school wasn’t so great for me the first time around, either! I think going in to teaching was a subconscious way for me to get it “right” the second time around… Ahhh, another neurosis to add to the list, lol.

      • Ohh my teaching – no that was out of the question for me I guess I’m not patient enough – my sisters know I tell things once and then I get mad /cross… I spent too much time being nice and making everyone comfortable. And I don’t think that kind of mind-set would make me fit for teaching.

        Hehe enjoy disecting your newest neurosis! No teachers are a very important group of people for student – they can make school heaven or hell … and students are somewhat psychic by the end of the first week of classes of the year hey have teachers figured out, how far they can go which boundaries they can push and when to stop. So knowing someone wants to help and not just getting the job done will make a difference – and yeah they will know.

  7. Be open and accepting of other people, even if they are different. I seek out diversity, and I am heavy handed, loud and impatient with people who can’t deal with the rainbow flags, burkas, Korean script, and same sex couples in my neighborhood. I took my mom to a gay bar, she was cool. I can’t understand the intolerance of younger people. Where does it end??
    Urbanista
    brendurbanist/at/gmail/dot/comv

  8. Thank you for participating in the hop and for the great post.

    peggy1994 (at) live (dot) com

  9. I think our youngsters are going to make this a better world for all. Hopefully we have started a good foundation for them to build on.

  10. Thank you for participating in the hop =D

  11. Thank you for sharing your awesome story.

  12. Thanks for being a part of the hop. It’s especially important to me since my youngest child came out to me as transgender male. I’m hoping every effort we make for understanding will help him in the future.

    lena.grey.iam@gmail.com

  13. What a lovely story. I’m sure that your support made a big difference to this student, and many others. Thanks!

  14. Thanks for the comments. We all need encouragement.

  15. Thanks for the wonderful post. As a teacher, I work to make my classroom a safe haven for all my kids, so they don’t have to suffer the way I did through school. I started tearing up as I read your post, it was beautiful and I’m rooting for all your kids too. As someone close to me once said, make a difference with them (the kids) now, cause they’ll be the ones to make the difference in the future. Thanks for participating!

    tiger-chick-1(at)hotmail(dot)com

  16. Great post! Thank you for taking part in the hop!
    sstrode at scrtc dot com

  17. Hi! Thanks for being apart of this fantastic hop! Its sad how some people are. Im happy to say, im glad were all different! I think being brave enough to say you love someone, no matter the sex, is amazing! People should find there happiness. Who cares what others think. The only people that matter, are the ones in the relationship. Too many people in this world are simple minded. I think its wonderful she came out, owned herself! If fantastic that you encourage your kids! 🙂 Thanks for sharing! Have a wonderful night!
    shadowluvs2read(at)gmail(dot)com

  18. This hop has got to be my favorite of all the hops because so many wonderful thoughtful posts by authors help bring awareness to the public.

    penumbrareads(at)gmail(dot)com


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